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January 2015

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January 2015

TSEEQ Licensing Agreement

January 2015

The State of Infant-Toddler Care and Education in New Jersey

December 2013
Judith M. Y. Alexandre, Natalie Makow, Kwanghee Jung, Steve Barnett

In this report to New Jersey Council for Young Children (NJCYC) Department of Education, researchers present the results of two studies of the quality of child care received by infants and toddlers in New Jersey which addressed the following questions: What is the quality of infant and toddler center-based care in New Jersey?  What is the quality of this infant/toddler care in each of the twenty one counties?  What are some common strengths and weaknesses of infant and toddler center-based care?    

Fact Sheet: The Abbott Preschool Program Longitudinal Effects Study (APPLES)

December 2013

Beginning in the 2005-2006 school year, the seventh year of implementation of the high-quality pre-K program in New Jersey's Abbott districts, NIEER began a longitudinal study to measure learning gains from participating in Abbott pre-K.  At the time the study began, quality had risen but not yet to its current level, and 40,500 3- and 4-year-old children were served. This fact sheet presents key takeaways from NIEER's longitudinal study of the program quality and child outcomes. 

The Essex Quality Improvement Project (EQUIP)

June 2013
Judith Marie Yves Alexandre, Natalie Makow, Kwanghee Jung, W. Steven Barnett

A survey of the quality of infant and toddler child care in Essex County (including Newark, Orange, Irvington and East Orange) finds that high quality care is scarce, especially for infants.  Poor quality care is far too common. Recommendations for improvement are offered based on a study of the determinants of care quality in Essex County.

Longitudinal Effects of the Arkansas Better Chance Program: Findings from First Grade through Fourth Grade

May 2013
Kwanghee Jung, W. Steven Barnett, Jason T. Hustedt, Jessica Francis

Arkansas’ state-funded preschool program has been found to have positive effects on children’s receptive vocabulary, math, and literacy.

Abbott Preschool Program Longitudinal Effects Study: Fifth Grade Follow-Up

March 2013
by W. Steven Barnett, Kwanghee Jung, Min-Jong Youn, and Ellen C. Frede

The multi-year study of New Jersey’s Abbott Preschool Program shows that children in the state’s most disadvantaged communities who participate in the pre-K program make significant gains in literacy, language, math and science through 4th and 5th grade.

Preschool Education as an Educational Reform: Issues of Effectiveness and Access

September 2011
By W. Steven Barnett

In this paper for the National Research Council and U.S. Equity and Excellence Commission, NIEER Director Steve Barnett looks at studies that provide rigorous estimates of the effects of some large scale, state-funded pre-K programs – both targeted and universal.  Using available data on preschool access in the United States, Dr. Barnett also provides estimates on pre-K enrollment by family income and the costs of providing educationally effective pre-K programs to all children.